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2000 AD Prog Slog

Friday, August 29, 2008

Prog 613

In Night Zero, cyborg cab driver Tanner has been hired to protect Allana, a beautiful woman in fear of her life, and with good reason. So far in the story, Allana has been killed twice and is now down to her last clone. Any murdering actioned upon her from now on is permanent.

Night Zero seems surprisingly traditional, especially when you consider how out there some of the work by newer 2000 AD creators has been recently. The story is told by writer John Bronson and artist Kev Hopgood with absolute clarity. Even the first person narrative is kept to a minimum which is surprising given the pulp novel influence on the strip and the fashion for it in mainstream comics in 1989.

Night Zero is undoubtedly professional. All of the rough edges have been filed away and any of the creators’ personalities seem to have been drained off. What’s left is a thrill that wouldn’t seem out of place had it appeared during the comic’s first ten years.

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6 Comments:

  • "What’s left is a thrill that wouldn’t seem out of place had it appeared during the comic’s first ten years."

    Exactly right. I think that's why I enjoyed it :)

    By Blogger Jez Higgins, at 10:43 am  

  • I enjoyed it at the time....

    but now on rereading it for the first time since 1989....is it just me or is this the dreariest strip to ever appear in 2000ad?

    By Blogger Derek, at 12:09 pm  

  • I loved Night Zero. I think for me a guy with a robot arm that could zap people was a cool enough gimmick. Although in retrospect that's rather tame by 2000 AD weirdness standards. Maybe I liked it because, as you say, it was very clear, unlike some contemporary strips such as Tyranny Rex and Zenith, which my 12-year old brain could not process.

    By Blogger alexf, at 1:09 pm  

  • Jez, I think I was trying to make a compliment :-)

    By Blogger Paul Rainey, at 5:59 pm  

  • Derek, it ain't the dreariest, believe me.

    By Blogger Paul Rainey, at 6:00 pm  

  • Alex, it's accessability is its secret, I think.

    By Blogger Paul Rainey, at 6:01 pm  

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